Thomas Suarez Fine Rare Maps

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Thumbnail Year Mapmaker Region Description Price (US$)

1696 Robyn, Jacob World Jacob Robyn: Nieuw Aerdsch Pleyn ... Separate publication. The present example is one of two known surviving examples of the proof state. The normal published state has entirely re-engraved borders. California is an island with a flat north coast. Parts of New Zealand and Tasmania appear, and Australia tentatively connects to New Guinea. Shirley 582. 22,000

1491
[anonymous]
World
[book]
(1555). An excellent example of the complete Mer des Histoires, with Medieval Mappamundi and map of Holy Land.
35,000

1524
Macrobius
World
[book}
Ambrosius Theodosius Macrobius, 1524 :
In Somnium Scipionis M. Tulii Ciceronis libri duo, et Saturnaliorum Libri VII. Cum scholiis & indicibus Ascensianis. Addito libello argutissimo Censorini de die Natali. Paris, in aedibus eiusdem Iodoci Badii Ascensii. According to Macrobius, two ocean belts girdle the earth, one equatorial, the other along opposing meridians, thus dividing the earth into four equal parts, each with one ‘island’ of land. His map shows one hemisphere only, composed of the known world (the quadrant containing Europe, Asia, and Africa), and a southern quadrant, the Antipodes.
3500

1593
Montanus, Arias
Palestine
[book]
Antiquitatum Iudicarum Libri IX. In quis, praeter Iudaeae, Hierosolymorum, & Templi Salomonis accuratam delineationem, praecipui sacri ac profani gentis ritus describuntur. Only edition of this rare volume comprising texts which had earned Arias Montanus the wrath of the Inquisition for what were considered "pro-Jewish" passages. The volumes' nine texts had appeared in Volume VIII of the Polyglot Bible, and by the publication of the present volume, the author had been exonerated of the charges.
22,000

1596
Benzoni
/de Bry
America
[book]
America Pars Sexta Sive Historiae Ab Hieronymo Benzono... engraved titlepage, double-page map of America, and double-page plan of Cusco. Engraved titlepage, pp.[i], ff.1-28 (blank versos) each with engraved plate illustration. Modern vellum binding, new endpapers. Repair to worm hole in margins, some strengthening of margins. The volume's important map of America is derived principally from Petrus Plancius' world map of the same year (1596). Virginia and the South-East are shown quite accurately for the time, following the then- state of the art maps of White and Le Moyne. Full-length portraits of Columbus, Vespucci, Magellan, and Pizarro flank the corners.
19,000

1528
Bordone
World
(1534?) Bordone's world map, one of few pre-Munster world maps that are ever obtainable, was responsible for popularizing the oval projection. It is preceded in use of the projection only by the separately-published map of Rosselli, which is known in only a few examples and was doubtfully of influence in this regard. Bordone thus set the stage for the many subsequent maps, e.g., those of Grynaeus (1532), Munster (1540), Gastaldi (1546), many of the "Lafreri"'-type world maps, and Ortelius (1570/1587).
5500

1531
Fine, Oronce
World
Nova, et Integra Universi Orbis Descriptio.. Excellent. 11.5 x 16.5 inches. The rare first state of the world map of Orontius Finaeus. One of the most compelling questions facing mapmakers in the first half of the sixteenth century was that of the relationship of the New World to the Orient. The question almost always pertained to North America; South America had grown on its own as truly a new world, connecting to Asia only via Central and North America, if the three Americas were contigeous and if North America connected to Asia (for example, in the maps of Gastaldi)..But Fineaus here adopts a different and very radical stance: both North and South America are individual extensions of Asia. This is the completion of a cycle that began when the old landbridge connecting Southeast Asia with Africa on Ptolemaic maps was opened by some cartographers late the previous century after the voyage of Vasco da Gama.
65,000

1544
Apianus, Petrus (Gemma Frisius)
World
(1575) Carta Cosmograhica cum los nombres ... Excellent condition and impression. 7.5 x 11 inches (map proper). State 2. Gemma had added this map to Apianus Cosmographia, a text of great importance first published in 1524. Nordenskiold (Facsimile Atlas, p 102) refers to Gesner in speculating that the map originally appeared in 1540 (apparently as a separate issue) independent of the Apianus text, though it is commonly known as part of Gemma's overhaul of the book in 1544 or 1545.
5800

1639
Camoes
World
Rare Spanish World Map, Printed in Madrid. World Map from 1639 Madrid edition of the famous epic poem by Camoes, Lusiadas. Spanish maps are excessively rare until the very late eighteenth century, and indeed there are no earlier Spanish maps which one could normally hope to acquire. The geography is rather interesting, not following the established patterns of the Dutch, Italians, or French


1628
Jansson, Jan
Arctic
Septentrionalum Terrarum descript. Excellent. 6 x 8 inches. This map follows the same geography as the 1606 folio and 1607 quarto maps of China. Korea appears as an island.
300

1513
Waldseemuller
America
Tabula Terre Nove. Wide margins, strong impression. Original color. Some wormholes at center, filled and barely discernable. 14 1/2 x 17 1/2 inches. This is the first printed map specifically devoted to the New World to appear in an atlas. Unlike the earlier and more limited map of Peter Martyr, it charts a continental Atlantic seaboard, showing a continuous coastline stretching from 35° south latitude, where the mouth of the Rio de la Plata lies, to the latitude of the St. Lawrence River in North America. The map forms what appears to be a complete Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic Seaboard. Cuba is named Isabella after Queen Isabella of Spain, who more than King Ferdinand, was responsible for the Crown's acceptance of Columbus proposal early in 1492.
125,000

1522
Waldseemuller /Fries
America
Very rare first issue of this early map of America. The most interesting difference between the Waldseemuller and Fries renderings is that Fries revives Columbus’ use of Parias for North America, using it to designate all of the mainland above the Caribbean, rather than in South America. The map charts a continuous coastline between North and South America, with the shoulder of South America being the map's single largest feature. The continent is depicted south to approximately where the mouth of the Rio de la Plata lies. In the Spanish Main are the islands of Cuba, Hispaniola, and Puerto Rico, among others. The Spanish standard is planted in Cuba.


1522 Waldseemuller /Fries America (1535) Oceani Occidentalis Seu Terrae Novae Tabula. An excellent example of the 1535 issue of this early map of America.
15,000
1540
Munster, Sebastian
America
Rare First State First Issue. Novae Insulae XVII Nova Tabula. Burden 12. 10.75 x 13.5 inches. Old damage by Magellan’s ship. Coming half a century after Columbus' initial landfall in the Indies, it is the first separate printed map of the Western Hemisphere, and the finest portrayal of Japan as a hypothetical close insular neighbor of America.
14,000

1561
Ruscelli
World
In 1561 Girolamo Ruscelli (ca. 1504-1566) adapted the maps of Gastaldi's 1548 Ptolemy for a new edition, twice the size of the Gastaldi plates.
1600

1540
Munster
America
(1552) Desirable 1552 edition, with borders, of the Munster Map of America
4500

1554
Bellero, Joan
America
(1556). On Bellero’s map it is possible speculatively to identify Gomes’ nomenclature. The B. d. S. Christoval at the pronounced indentation in the Atlantic coast is probably Cape Cod and Massachusetts Bay, named by Gomes for Saint Christopher because he reached it on that saint’s feast day, July 25. Continuing east, the Merrimac River is R. d. buena madre (“River of the the Good Mother”), named for Saint Anne, as Gomes reached there on her saint’s day, July 26. Rio seco (“Dry River”) is the Saco River, Arcipielago (i.e., Archipelago) is Casco Bay, and C. de S. maria is probably Cape Small. R. de las gamas (“River of the Deer”) would be Penobscot Bay and River. Just east of it is Costa de medanos (“Coast of Sand Dunes”), possibly a reference to the sand-like appearance of the mountaintops of Mount Desert Island. R. de montanas (River of Mountains) is Frenchman’s Bay or Pleasant River, and Castenal (“Chestnut Grove”) may be Machias Bay. Continuing northeast after a small void area is B. de la ensenado (“Bay of the Rounded Gulf”?), which may correspond to Passamaquoddy Bay. R. de la buella (i.e., vuelta, or “River of the Return”) is probably the River St. John, from where Gomes began the voyage back to La Coruna. This is as analyzed by W. F. Ganong in Crucial Maps in the Early Cartography and Place-Nomenclature of the Atlantic Coast of Canada (1964), p. 174-189. Bellero’s map falls into Ganong’s “Chaves-Santa Cruz” archtype. According to another view of the nomenclature, “B. d. S. Christoval” is lower New York Bay, “R. d. buena madre” is perhaps the Connecticut or Thames River, and “R. de las gamas” is the Hudson River, though misplaced (see Sauer, Sixteenth Century North America, p. 67-68).Excellent. 5 x 7 inches.


1561
Zeno /Ruscelli America
First Issue of the Ruscelli, and the earliest obtainable issue. Originally published in woodcut form three years earlier (1558), this map is "one of the most interesting and controversial documents in the history of maritime exploration" (-Brown). It purports to show the discoveries made in Greenland and the north Atlantic in 1380 by the Venetians Nicolo and Antonio Zeno, as per a MS in the possession of the explorer's heirs.
1200

1561
Ruscelli
America /Southern North America
(1574) Nveva Hispania Tabvla Nova, Excellent. 7.5 x 10 inches. Gastaldi's was the first separate printed map of the southern part of North America; the work's delineation of the region is vastly superior to other printed maps of the period, delineating the American Southwest, California, and the Gulf Coast in fine detail. California is a peninsula, and the Seven Cities of Cibola are recorded. Burden 31.
1400

1713
Lasor
America /Cuba
From the copperplate originally used for L'Isole piu famose del Mondo of Porcacchi (1572 and subsequent), with maps by the outstanding Paduan engraver Girolamo Porro, here recylced in the early eighteenth century. Excellent. 4 x 5.5 inches.
150

1589
Ortelius
Pacific
/America
(1591/92), Maris Pacifici, (quod vulgo Mar del Zur)... Excellent. 13.5 x 19.5 inches. Original color; narrow margins; toning at center
7,000

1589
Ortelius Pacific
/America
(1595), Maris Pacifici, (quod vulgo Mar del Zur)... Excellent. 13.5 x 19.5 inches. Original color; narrow margins; toning at center
12,000

1594
Benzoni
/de Bry
America
/Caribbean
Occidentalis Americae partis, velearum Regionum quas Christophorus Columbus primu detexit... Excellent. Classic map of the Caribbean and Southeast, based on Le Moyne and others sources, accompanying the account of Girolamo Benzoni in America.
14,000

1595
Rosaccio
America
[untitled map of America]. 5 x 7 inches. Excellent. An interesting example of how map evolution was never a steadily "forward" affair, this rough little map may to be a reissue of an earlier map, but in fact was created for the Teatro del Cielo of 1595. The geography is primitively copied from the Ortelius map of 1570, though with differences beyond the crudeness. As noted by Burden (entry 89), Quivera is shown twice, the Sierra Nevada is marked, and a city is placed at the head of the Gulf of California.
550

1606
Hondius
America
America.  15 x 19.5 inches. Original color. Excellent.

7500

1618
Bertius
America
/Central America
(1618) Iucatana. Small worm hole in lower left, in corner of title box (easily visible in image). Else excellent. 3.75 x 5 inches.
225

1625
Sparke
/Hondius
America
/South America
Southerne America. 5.5 x 7.25 inches. Excellent. The original set of Mercator maps acquired by Jodocus Hondius in 1604 included one of the Western Hemisphere, but not one South America by itself. Hondius added such a map to the folio map of 1606, and prepared a reduced version of it for the Atlas Minor of the following year. This map is struck from that same plate, here accompanied by English text, from a London issue of the Mercator Atlas.
385

1635
Blaeu
America
/Caribbean
(c1640) Insvlae Americae in Oceano Septentrionali cum Terris adiacentibus. Excellent. Huge upper margin, small but adequate lower margin. 15 x 21 inches.
1200

1680c
Freschot,
Don Casimir
America
/Gulf Coast, Florida, California
Extremely rare board game map of the Gulf Coast and Mexico. Map of the Gulf Coast, California, and Central America, from Geografia ridotta a giuoco per istruttione della giovane nobiltà veneziana. Excellent. 2 x 2 inches. Trimmed from broadsheet. This map was cut from a broadsheet board game known to survive in only one complete example*. The stated purpose of the game was "the teaching of geography to the young Venetian nobility." The "goose game" was made by Casimir Freschot, a Benedictine Priest and author, and engraved by Anton Francesco Lucini. It is said to be the earliest geographical game to be published. The 'board' comprised 153 squares containing small maps, arranged in a spiral, with a plan of Venice at the centre. Above the game were four larger maps of the continents, the rules, including the prizes and forfeits for landing on squares, and a dedication. There is only one known complete example, in the Biblioteca Nazionale Marciana in Venice. *Courtesy Altea Maps, quoting "Charta Geographica" magazine, vol.1, page 76.
600

1697
Moullard-Sanson
America
/Celestial
Planisphere Urano-Gepgraphique c'estadire Les Spheres Celeste et Terrestre... Excellent. 11.5 x 8 inches (engraved area, the lowermost 2.5 inches being blank). During the final years of the seventeenth century, Moullard-Sanson composed several hemispheres from unusual perspectives. This example superimposes the heavens over the Western Hemisphere, with California as an island.
365

1697
Moullard-Sanson America
/Pacific
Hemisphere Occidental du Globe Terrestre... Excellent. 11.5 x 8 inches. State II according to McLaughlin, with the pagination at the upper left and lower right.

During the final years of the seventeenth century, Moullard-Sanson composed several hemispheres from unusual perspectives. Perhaps the most extraordinary is this map intended to show the Americas and Pacific from the inside of the earth looking out. California is an island on the 1656 model of the elder Sanson. As was typical at this time, there is the uncommittal suggestion that New Zealand is part of Terra Australis. The Solomon Islands are shown near New Guinea, and with the land of Quiros.
475

1748
Anson
Pacific
(North)
A chart of the Pacific Ocean from the Equinoctial to the Latitude of 39 1/2 d No. 11 x 35 inches. Excellent.
Bound in with the account of George Anson's circumnavigation, this remarkable chart is said to be taken from Spanish charts commandeered by Anson en route. It shows the routes of the Spanish galleons between Mexico and the Philippines, and provides an unusually large-scale record of the islands recorded in the north Pacific just prior to the great voyages of Cook, La Perouse, and others.
400

1797
La Perouse
Asia
/Philippines
Costumes des Habitans de Manille. 10 x 15 3/4 inches + title. Excellent.
The great French explorer La Perouse reached the Philippines in February of 1787. From the Spanish colony he continued north and began his important exploration of the seas north of Japan.


325

1797
La Perouse
Asia
/Philippines
Vue de Cavite dans la Baie de Manille. 10 x 15 3/4 inches + title. Excellent.
385

1528
Bordone
Asia
/Japan
ciampagu. Excellent. 3.25 x 5.75 inches on full untrimmed page. RARE FIRST ISSUE.
Based purely on the second-hands reports of Marco Polo and the cartographic tradition for the island that had evolved during the fifteenth century, this first map of Japan predates the earliest known European encounter with the island by a few decades. More commonly found in the Bordone Isolario, this rare first appearance is from the Libro di Benedetto Bordone. On verso : map of Java
4500

1522
Fries, Lorenz
Asia
/SE Asia
(1535) Tabula nova Indiae orientalis & meridionalis. 28 x 43 cm. + title.
Fine example of this important map. Although the atlas prepared in 1522 by Lorenz Fries was for the most part copied from the 1513 atlas of Waldseemuller, this map was not part of that earlier work and is the creation of Fries himself. The sources material, nonetheless, remains the eminent Waldseemuller, probably the separately-published world map of 1507. Waldseemuller, in turn, drew largely from such fifteenth-century sources as Martellus.
This woodcut map of Malaya and the East Indian islands is a landmark for the region, being the first specifically devoted to Southeast Asia..

4200

1522
Fries, Lorenz
Asia
/China
(1535) First Printed Map to Focus on China & Japan
untitled woodcut map of China and Japan. 11 1/2 x 18 inches + wide margins. Fine example of the first map specifically delineating the East Coast of China and Japan. This work is one of the "new" maps that appeared in Lorenz Fries' Ptolemy, charting lands which were unknown to that Alexandrian scientist; Ptolemy did not attempt to draw the east coast of Asia, and was unaware of the existence of Japan. Even Waldseemuller, who nine years earlier had produced new and radical maps reflecting the recent Portuguese exploits around Africa and into the Indian Ocean, had not made a comparable map as this work of Fries, and had not even included Japan on the the world map from his 1513 Ptolemy.
7200

1548
Gastaldi
Asia
/SE Asia
Giacomo Gastaldi, 1548 :
India Tercera Nova Tabula. Excellent. First detailed map of Southeast Asia based on empirical data.
2800

1606
Mercator-Hondius
Asia
/SE Asia
India Orientalis. 15 x 19.5 inches. An excellent example in original color. The Insulæ Indiæ Orientalis is one of few maps to show any trace of Francis Drake’s presence in Southeast Asia. Hondius had spent several years in London, having fled there in about 1583 to avoid religious persecution.
4500

1760
Herbert, William
Asia
/Gulf of Siam
[untitled chart of the Gulf of Siam]. 21 x 16 inches. Original wash color. Some scuffing near bottom, reinforced on verso along bottom, else fine.
The English mapmaker William Herbert (1718-95) traveled to India in about 1748 as a purser’s clerk. Back home in the early 1750s, he set up a map and print shop on London Bridge, and in 1758, with the encouragement of the East India Company, he introduced a new pilot guide, the New Directory for the East Indies. Herbert gathered superior sources than those used in Mount & Page's The Third Book, consulting such works as Mannevillette’s Neptune Oriental, as well as the navigator William Nicholson and the cartographer Samuel Dunn.
The Chao Phraya River is charted through "Siam" (Ayutthaya). Cambodia and Vietnam, and the Mekong appear prominently.
3500

1491
[anonymous]
/Dominican Burchard of Mt. Sion
Palestine
[Untitled map of Palestine] First printed map based on first-hand observation,depicting Palestine based on a 13th century pilgrimage. The third woodblock (1475 /1488 /1491-1543). 13 x 16 1/2 inches. Replaced very small chip in lower left corner (as visible in image), else excellent condition with wide paper intact between halves, and very good margins
Campbell (Earliest Print Maps) remarks that the maker of the maps for the 1491 Mer des Hystoires was a "thinking individual", because in the corresponding world maps he corrects errors made in 1475 block and slavishly copied in the 1488 block.
7500

1493
Schedel
Constantinople
Woodcut. 9 x 21 inches. Excellent. Discoloration at upper center as visible in image.
A rare example apparently bound with a guard, and thus with a "perfect" centerfold, whereas most examples of the view always have some centerfold restoration because they were bound by being sewn through.
2600

1496
Schonsperger, Johann Palestine
/Jerusalem
[woodcut view of the destruction of Jerusalem]
4 x 7.5 inches on text sheet 8 x 11. Margin trimmed on right, else an excellent example.
Very rare fifteenth century view of Jerusalem, from a pirated miniature copy of the Nuremberg Chronicle. Laor (1127) describes this German issue as the first, with a Latin edition following in 1497.
350

1601
Linschoten
/de Bry
Africa
/Mozambique Island
Excellent. 8.5 x 10.75 inches.
Mozambique Island was a trading center for Arab merchants from the 10th through the late 15th centuries. Vasco da Gama reached the island in 1498 and claimed it for Portugal. It retained importance in the European attempts to command the trade with the East Indies and India through the nineteenth century.
285

1561
Ruscelli
Europe
/Italy
Tavola Nuova d'Italia. Excellent. 7.5 x 10.5 inches.
First edition of Ruscelli's elegantly engraved copper-plate map after Gastldi.
400

1493
Schedel
Woodcut
/Anti-Semitism
Moderately toned. Two mended tears, one into woodcut, the other affecting the verso text. One wormhole, plugged (see comet image).
Infamous anti-Semitic woodcut, and early comet depiction. This notorious woodcut from the Nuremberg Chronicle shows Jews murdering the child Simon of Trent.  Wikipedia explains that ...Simon of Trent, also known as Simeon; born late 15th century, died c. March 21, 1475) was a boy from the city of Trento, Italy whose disappearance was blamed on the leaders of the city's Jewish community based on their confessions under torture, causing a major blood libel in Europe with ramifications that lasted almost five centuries.The boy was said to have been murdered so as to use his blood in religious rituals. See Wikipedia for further background on the history and the cult that sprung up around Simon, which lasted nearly five centuries, until it was disbanded by the Pope in 1965. This image has often been erroneously identified as a circumcision. On verso is a woodblock illustration of a comet that appeared in the skies of January, 1472.
450

1538
Solinus
/Munster
Asia
/America
(NW Coast)
A mint example of the first issue of this interesting map. The map covers the area from the Cape of Good Hope and the Nile, through the Indian Ocean, India, China, and the wsetern Pacific Ocean. On the upper right a small portion of the western coast of North America is depicted, labelled simply Terra Incognita. This is considered to be the earliest known printed map to show the Northwest Coast of America. The text relates that this coast has “in our day been explored by man,” which has sometimes been taken to refer to an early, unrecorded voyage to the American Northwest. A minority view holds that the landmass might be part of Japan rather than America. Issues of Solinus' another of Solinus' works, de Situ orbis terrarum, had appeared in 1473 and 1520.
4500

1591
Le Moyne
/de Bry
America
/Florida
Floridae Americae Provinciae Recens & exactissima descriptio Auctore Iacobo le Moyne cui cognomen de Morgues, Qui Laudonnierum...
The map contains many striking details, frequently  erroneous, which were incorporated in other maps for over a hundred and fifty years. It was Le Moyne’s misfortune to have many of his errors incorporated and even exaggerated in Mercator’s map of 1606, upon which for half a century much of the subsequent cartography of the region was based. Le Moyne’s coastline is usually correct for latitude, but the shore extends too far east rather than northeast in direction. This caused a striking error in Mercator’s map, with a compensating enlargement of the Virginia region; the mistake was corrected somewhat by Jansson 1641 and those who followed him.
    Along the top of the map, to the north, extends the shore of a sea, probably Verrazano’s Sea. It is unnamed and has no channel connecting it to the Atlantic. A similar body of water is found in Lescarbot 1611 and Seller 1679.
23,000

1598
Solis, Hernando de
America
(1603) Americae sive novi orbis nova descriptio. Hernando de Solis, Valladolid, 1598 [but 1603]. Long tear mended without loss.
Rare map from Giovanni Botero’s Relaciones vniuersales del mundo incorporating Ortelius’ maps of 1570 and 1587. The bulge in the western coast of South America that was popularized by Mercator (1569) and copied by Ortelius (1570) is used, while the 1587 map’s far more advanced western Pacific is used. Burden (129) notes that the map “is rarely found in the book, which is itself scarce.”

9500

1797
Maurelle, Don Francisco Antonio
(La Perouse)
Pacific
The Galician navigator Don Francisco Antonio Maurelle made a number of discoveries in the Southwest Pacific in 1781 as a result of attempting an eastward crossing along latitudes other than those well-proven for the purpose. Leaving Manila in late November of 1780, an inopportune time of year for the sail to Mexico via the tradition northern route, he decided to attempt a new route through the central and southern latitudes. This proved futile — ultimately he gave up and sailed north to catch the same winds that propelled routine Spanish crossings — but in the attempt, Maurelle came across islands not previously known to Europeans.
    Most significant of these was Vava’u, which James Cook had learned of, but failed to investigate, fourteen years earlier during his third voyage. On February 27 of 1781, Maurelle, having woven his way past various Melanesian islands and skimming the Solomons, reached Tongan waters. Amicable trade with the people of Late was followed by the discovery of “an island right ahead, on which was a lofty mountain, appearing scorched at the summit, but exhibiting a pleasing verdure on its sides covered with trees.” They stayed for nearly three weeks and provided a fine account of the island and its people. The French navigator Jean-François Galaup de La Pérouse, while in China, obtained a manuscript detailing Maurelle’s voyage, from which the published map was made, recording Vava’u by both its proper name and that dubbed by Maurelle, ‘Majorca’.
425.

1672
Doncker
America
/Caribbean
Pascaert vande Caribische Eylanden...
The chartmaker Doncker, though sometimes engaging in collaboration with other makers, had a reputation for searching out and compiling his own data, in contrast to most others in the commercial Dutch map trade. Burden 339.
6500

1659
Doncker
America
California, etc
(1660) Pascaart vertoonen de Zeecusten van Chili, Peru, Hispania Nova, Nova Granada, en California...  Excellent.
Burden (340) mentions that this map “depicts California as an island on a larger scale than any earlier sea chart.”
4500

1587
Mercator
World
(1595) Orbis Terrrae Compendiosa Descriptio Quam ex Magna Universale Gerardi Mercatoris... 
A fine example of the rare first atlas issue from the original Mercator Atlas of the famed world map of Mercator on a double-hemispherical projection. Only two issues were actually published by the Mercator family, this 1595 issue and that of 1602; all subsequent issues were published by the Hondius firm.
8500

1556
Ramusio
America
/Hispaniola
(1565) Isola Spagnuola.Excellent example of this early detailed map of Hispaniola, from Ramusio’s I Navigationi.
450

1556
Ramusio
America
/New England
La Nvova Francia, G. B. Ramusio, Venice 1556. Excellent. 
An example of the rare first state /first issue. The chronicler Ramusio credits Giacomo Gastaldi with authorship of this map. It is the first printed map focusing on the region of New England, and it established the name “New France” (La Nuova Francia) to denote the French possessions in the north.
11,000

1636
Jansson
America
North America
(State 2, c1641).America Septentrionalis.
An early separate map of North America, commonly known as the work of Jansson because his name appears on the cartouche in states two and subsequent, but actually by Henry Hondius. This work is important for focusing closely on California as an island; California, both in shape and nomenclature, is based on the map of Briggs (1625). It is equally important as an evolutionary work for the mapping of the Great Lakes, shown by Jansson as a large Lac des Iroquois charted at the source of the St. Lawrence, with the vague premonitions of four other lakes appearing near it.
5600









































































1584 Ortelius
Asia; China
Chinae, olim Sinarum regionis, nova descriptio. auctore Ludovico Georgio... Abraham Ortelius, Antwerp, 1584.

First state, with the Philippines not labelled. First year of publication. Excellent condition save for mended tear in lower margin, not entering engraved surface.

This map first appeared in Ortelius’ 1584 Addendum. This example is from the Theatrum of the same year.
7500